Duck and Artichoke Risotto; the update: ceilings

I forgot to tell you what I did with the rest of the Roast Duck.

First let me tell you that mon mari est très heureux.

The sheet rock is up, the insulation is up, it’s staying warm…..

And he gets to start the part he likes best: finishing.

Last week he bought a trailer-load of ceiling boards.

Naturally, on our flat, level ceiling they go up very quickly.

He did a panel of recessed lights in one corner.

Ceiling_lights
And he cleaned up the beam a bit.

I’m going to miss those cobwebs….

Some of the ceiling boards actually got to go up without any cutting, above the beam.

Ceiling_left

The blue arrow is pointing to the shadow cast by the upper beam onto the ceiling.  There is actually a gap there (for new, future cobwebs) but only as far as the ceiling boards are up.  The rest will have to be cut and fitted up to the beam, not above it.

Here’s the same beam from the other side:

Ceiling_right

The blue arrow is pointing to the same gap; the purple arrow is pointing to what will be a light fixture on this side of the beam.

Finally, here’s the view of the work from the bathroom door – including, of course, the ladders and scaffolding.  The arrows are pointing to the same things as in the above photo.

There is a skylight on this side of the room.

Ceiling
Another thing mon mari likes about working on ceilings – it’s warm…. Heat rising and that whole bit.

Now, about that leftover duck….

My favorite way to use leftovers is in risotto.

In keeping with yesterday’s post about weight loss and portion control, let me point out that I use 2/3 cup of rice for a main course risotto for the two of us.  With nothing else for dinner, that is the perfect amount, with mon mari eating about 3/5th of the dish. When I made more, we ate more, but this leaves us pleasantly full but not stuffed ;-))

Remember last November when we made a pilgrimage to the Frozen Food Store?  One of the things I bought was artichoke bottoms.  It’s the best part of the artichoke, and these frozen babies have had all the fussy work done by SOE (some one else).

Risotto with Duck and Artichokes

Duck and Artichoke Risotto

2/3 cup Arborio rice (or other rice specifically for risotto – Carnaroli or Vialone Nano)
1/2 cup dry, white wine
2 1/4 cups chicken stock
1 small  onion
2 tsp butter
1/2 cup (2oz, 60gr) Parmesan cheese – freshly grated
Condimenti

Heat chicken stock and keep hot over low heat. Finely chop onion. In medium sauce pan heat butter; add onion and sauté until transparent then add rice and sauté, stirring, for 2 – 3 minutes until rice has white center. Add white wine and stir.
Start condimenti. When wine is almost absorbed add a 1/3 cup of stock, stir. (No need to stir constantly but do stir from time to time.) When stock is almost absorbed add another 1/3 cup and continue adding 1/3 cup at a time and stirring. Before you add the last 1/3 cup taste a few kernels of rice. They should be just ‘al dente’ – slightly resistant to the tooth but fully cooked. If more stock is needed add it a few tbs at a time and waiting until almost completely absorbed.
At this point risotto will be thick but not stiff – there will still be visible liquid and it will not hold it’s shape on a plate. Add the Parmesan and the condimenti, stir well, pour into a bowl or risotto platter and serve immediately. It will continue to absorb liquid and the leftovers (if any) will be quite stiff.
The risottos that we have eaten in northern Italy have all been served in soup plates (flattish bowls) and eaten with a spoon – not a fork.

Condimenti

1 1/2 – 2 cups leftover roast duck
5 large artichoke bottoms
1/2 cup chicken stock
1/3 cup sliced green olives

While risotto is cooking, heat stock in a medium skillet. Add artichokes and cook until tender and / or thawed.  Remove and cut into wedges.  Return to the skillet along with the duck and keep warm until needed. 
Before adding to risotto, drain any remaining liquid and add olives.

Not to be preachy but…..

Risotto is easy and healthy:

  • You do NOT have to stir constantly.
  • You do NOT have to add a glob of butter at the end to make it good.

(Where do some of these chefs get these ideas, anyway?)

7 thoughts on “Duck and Artichoke Risotto; the update: ceilings”

  1. How gorgeous is that??? I am talking about the beautiful ceiling and the risotto! I was going to make risotto with some left over frozen turkey…then I remembered I gave the rest to my son and his girlfriend to have for sandwiches! Dang! Mushroom risotto it will be. Your home is going to look so gorgeous when all is said and done!

  2. Wow, that is going to look great; I am looking forward to seeing how it ends up!
    And that risotto looks fantastic. I agree about the artichoke bottoms – almost everything is better when done by SOE!

  3. Risotto is my go-to for when I have tons of food in the fridge and no idea what to do with it! The duck in it must taste so rich and delicious!

  4. Thanks, Ina, Mushroom risotto is good!
    Zoomie, it’s so nice to see some finishing work!
    Rich, especially artichokes – they are such a fussy job!
    manningroad, I don’t on principle – I think it’s a myth perpetuated by chefs!
    Joanne, the duck was good; the risotto easy!
    Elizabeth, it was good – 1st, roast a duck, then….

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