Chicken Korma with Almonds and Apricots

Does anyone remember what I wanted ground almonds for?

Nope, me either….

But there it was, lurking in the back of my pantry…  A bag of ground almonds.

Nicely stored in a sealed container, of course.

I have no idea why or when I bought it, but I decided it was time I used it.

Last spring ( did I mention time was slipping by me rather quickly of late?) our friend from Spain stopped for a visit and brought me a recipe.

He loves to cook and does mostly Indian and Thai recipes.

Unfortunately, I’m not able to eat most of his food as he likes to make it blazing hot.

He made this Chicken Korma, based on a recipe by Madhur Jaffrey, and decided it was mild enough even for my wimpy taste buds.

I modified it a but further – eliminating the Cayenne Pepper and Garam Masala, and making only enough for 2 servings..

It was wonderful – without heat but with lots of complex flavors.

Chicken Korma, with Almonds and Apricots

Total time: 45 minutes

 Ingredients:

  • 2 chicken breasts, boneless, skinless, each breast cut into 3 pieces
  • 1/2 cup ground almonds (2oz, 60gr) 
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 piece of ginger, about 1/2 inch long, finely minced
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5 cardamom pods
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 1 inch of a cinnamon stick
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 2 tsp tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup (4oz, 120gr) Greek yogurt 
  • 3oz (90gr) dried apricots, cut in half 
  • 1/3 cup (3oz, 90ml) chicken stock
  • Rice:
  • 1/2 cup (3.3oz, 95gr)  Basmati Rice
  • 1 cup (8oz, 240ml) chicken stock

Chicken Korma

Instructions:

  • Heat 1 tbs oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
  • Add bay leaves, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon and stir-fry 10 seconds.
  • Add onion and fry until tender and starting to brown..
  • Reduce heat to medium, add garlic, ginger, cumin, coriander and stir-fry 2 minutes longer.
  • Add tomato paste and stir well to combine.
  • Add chicken pieces, ground almonds, chicken stock and heat to simmering
  • Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Cook rice.
  • Add yogurt to chicken and stir well to combine.
  • Add apricots, cover and simmer for 10 minutes longer.
  • When rice is done, fluff with a fork and spoon on to 2 plates.
  • Top with Chicken Korma and serve.

Print Recipe

I have new spices in my kitchen!

spicesI found them at the Christmas market in Bordeaux.  It’s the first time I’ve been able to buy either of them here, but, remember I live out in the middle of nowhere….

Sumac is used in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking.  It has a slightly tart taste.

Zaatar is a conundrum.

My spice bible says zaatar is a mixture of lemon thyme, sumac and sesame.

My Moroccan cook book says za’atar is the Arabic word for thyme, specifically a wild thyme that is more pungent than the cultivated varieties. A substitute would be dried Greek thyme or fresh lemon thyme. It goes on to say not to confuse it with the Lebanese herb and spice mix used to sprinkle on bread.

Ha!  I’ve been using fresh lemon thyme for years.

I did say that I was going to expand my culinary horizons.

I could wish that the fun spices didn’t come in those silly, useless glass tubes, though…..

If you want nutrition information for the recipe, try this site: Calorie Count

13 thoughts on “Chicken Korma with Almonds and Apricots”

  1. Seems you found an excellent use for the almonds!
    I love when I discover I know than I thought, somebody just gave it another name. Who knows when the spices are gone there may be some odd need those glass tubes will be perfect for … as soon as you pitch them it will become clear.

  2. I am going back to Morocco in about 3-4 weeks but I cannot bring the spices back if purchased at market sadly due to our rigid customs.

  3. That chicken looks delicious.

    Zaatar is local to Israel – we use it on salads, in yogurt-based tangy soft white cheeses (labane), sometimes on roast chicken (in moderation), in eggs, and it’s EXCELLENT sprinkled on pita wedges grilled with a bit of olive oil… Just taste a bit and see what appeals.

  4. I had a small bag of almond flour in my pantry, too, with no idea of why I bought it. But I found a recipe for a clementine cake that called for it and it was delicious! I will be posting about that cake soon, so if you have some of that flour left over, save it!

  5. Tanna, actually, I hope I find a use for them – they’re kind of cool LOL

    Kate, can you mail them to yourself? What a shame you can’t bring them back… But how wonderful to be going back. We’re thinking seriously about a trip – but don’t know when. A bit closer for us…..

    Robin, eggs definitely,,, I would be more free with trying it if I knew I could get it again before next Christmas LOL

    Sullimaybe, it was a lovely mix of spices…. You;re welcome 😉

    Pam, clementine cake, eh? I’ll watch for it. Thanks.

    Penny, is there a difference between almond flour and ground almonds? This was pretty course – like cornmeal. I really have no idea – but I used it for something. The mind is a terrible thing to lose.

  6. Thanks for the kind offer Robin – and I may take you up on it. There is a large Asian market in Bordeaux that I’m going to check out on our next trip (for plumbing supplies) and a few weeks. If I don’t find it there I’ll let you know. Now I don’t have to be so careful LOL

  7. Another wonderful recipe! Made it tonight for the family, with store-bought almond meal – none lurking anywhere at home. Couldn’t resist adding the cayenne pepper (just a touch) and the Garam Masala – beautiful additions. Thanks for the recipes – always stellar flavours.

Comments are closed.

Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap