Braised Tung-Po Pork, the update

I was looking through my copy of ‘The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook’ last week for something interesting.

I was thinking of a stir-fry perhaps, like the Kung Pao Chicken.

This is about as different in technique as one can get, being a slow braise rather than a quick stir-fry, and it was easier to finish as well.

It didn’t have all the flavors of the Kung Pao Chicken – no water chestnuts or peanuts, for example.

But the pork was falling-apart tender and the sauce / gravy was fantastic, and even though made with a lot of soy sauce, it wasn’t too salty.

I did modify the recipe a wee bit, and I served it with Basmati Rice.

It was about 10 minutes of actual work time.

Braised Tung-Po Pork

Total time: 90 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork tenderloin, 14oz (420gr), cut into 1 1/2″ (5cm) pieces
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 3 slices ginger root, peeled and minced
  • 3/4 cup (6oz, 180ml) hot water
  • 1/3 cup (3oz, 90ml) less salt soy sauce
  • 1 tbs sugar
  • 3 tbs sherry
  • 8oz (240gr) fresh spinach
  • 2 shallots, sliced
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbs cornstarch (maizena) dissolved in 2 water

Tung Po Pork

Instructions:

  • Heat olive oil in a heavy pot. Add pork, a few pieces at a time and quickly sauté until lightly browned.
  • Return all pork to pan, add water, ginger, soy sauce, cover and simmer, slowly, for 45 minutes.
  • Add sugar, sherry, and simmer 30 minutes longer
  • Heat the sesame oil in a large skillet. Add shallots and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes.
  • Add spinach and 2 tbs of pork cooking liquid. Quickly cook spinach, turning constantly, just until it starts to wilt.
  • Remove and arrange on platter.
  • Increase heat under pork, add cornstarch mixture and stir until sauce is thickened.
  • Spoon pork over spinach and serve, remaining sauce on the side.

Print Recipe

Work continues on the ceiling.

As you can see he started on the other side of the room – I think that’s so he can be closer to the radiator. It’s been very cold here lately.

ceiling5

One of the reasons it takes so long is he has to stain and varnish the boards before he can put the up. You can see some of them drying on the scaffolding.

ceiling6

At least, that’s what he tells me…..

Who am I to argue?

Comments 7

  1. That ceiling is going to be gorgeous when it’s finished. And your dish here looks delish. Right up my alley with simple, easy ingredients.

  2. Yum. I miss Asian food and don’t go out for it much. I should try to get some ingredients now that there are more food store choices in Rodez and certainly online as well. Where do you get your sesame oil?

  3. nightsmusic, he does like to do wood ceilings but this one is a real jigsaw puzzle.

    Zoomie, well, he seems to be happy… LOL

    Betty, we love it but rarely go out for it. although we do always have lunch at the Asian market when we go there…. which has sesame oil. But I also find it at the local Intermarche – in the British aisle. If I don’t have it I use walnut oil – we live in a big walnut growing area so it’s pretty common

Comments are closed.