Yellow Squash with Mushrooms

Normally, when I buy mushrooms, they come in an 8oz (250gr) container. Occasionally they are offered loose but not often.

When cooking for two, which is also my normal, I only use 4oz (125gr) in whatever dish I’m making. So, like everything else when cooking for two, I have to plan ahead. Mushrooms don’t keep well….

Sometimes it’s mushroom omelets for breakfast. More often it’s another main course or side that gets a little mushroom treatment.

Like this summer squash.

Why not?

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Yellow Squash with Mushrooms

Time to transition from summer to fall – summer squash and brown mushrooms.

  • Author: Katie
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 2 servings 1x
  • Category: Vegetables

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 medium yellow squash, cut in half the long way, then sliced
  • 1 medium red onion, roughly chopped
  • 4oz (125gr) mushrooms, trimmed, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tbs soy sauce
  • 2 tbs Balsamic vinegar

Instructions

  • Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. 
  • Add paprika, onion, and sauté until onion is tender. 
  • Turn heat to medium, add garlic, mushrooms, squash slices and continue to sauté for 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until squash starts to get soft. 
  • Add soy sauce and vinegar.
  • Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes to blend flavors.
  • Serve.

Notes

I used brown, cremini mushrooms but any mushroom will work.

Keywords: yellow squash, summer squash, mushrooms

Yellow Squash with Mushrooms

It’s been dry here. Since about the middle of June we’ve had rain twice, both times in the last 2 weeks. Neither was substantial enough to have an effect.

We’ve not had a watering ban, however, so I continue to water the potager and the herbs I have in planters and along the fence.

And I continue to fill the birdbath.

It used to sit on top of the well where it was well-hidden from human eyes and, often, full of leaves. I got in the habit of cleaning it by using the hose and a hard stream of water.

Mon mari moved it when he trimmed the trees and put it next to the peony bush. Now when I clean it I also can water the peony without feeling guilty about watering a flower during a drought. We end up with this wonderful green patch in the middle of our dry, dead lawn.

I have never seen a bird take a bath in it, but yesterday all the doves in the neighborhood were having a pool party. There were at least a dozen drinking and flicking their wings in the water. That’s the reason I keep it full. In such dry weather the birds and insects don’t have access to much water around here. They seem to appreciate it. When it gets low and I clean and fill it, there are usually 8 or 10 or 12 bees that come for a drink before I’m done.

I always make sure to wet the rim so they can get an easy drink.

So far they’ve been polite and haven’t threatened me.

2 thoughts on “Yellow Squash with Mushrooms”

  1. Your bird bath area looks like my raised garden area. They’re both about as green though now, we’re getting rain so the grass has finally greened up after having no discernible rain since the third week in July. The past week now has made up for it in spades.

    I always put a rather large rock in my bird bath, one I’ve cleaned up. It makes an extra spot for the birds to reach the water because they can cling to it rather than just the edge. The birds use the rock, the bees, the bugs, a tree frog sunning itself (that was cool) even the butterflies have used it.

    I’m sure I’ve mentioned this before, but I used to be able to buy fresh mushrooms at $1 for 8 ounces. They were packaged as such and I’d use half for one thing and half for another, like you. Then about two years ago, someone decided to slap an Organic sticker on them and they now cost $3.50 for the same size package. Well of course they’re organic! Always have been but what a way to cash in on something. *sigh*

  2. A rock! what a good ides…. I’ll do that.Glad to help the birds and the bees lol
    I remember a friend in Andorra telling me that slugs and snails were good things to find in your produce because it meant it was organic – without the hefty price tag.
    As to your mushrooms – it’s like the use by date on water…..

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