Grilled Lamb Steaks with Rosemary Mustard Butter; more butter

I waited tables in a restaurant when I was a student. It was the only restaurant in our village of less than 300 inhabitants. It was rather famous for its steaks and lobster tail.

It was also a typical small town café with formica tables, paper placemats and napkins, home-made pies and donuts, unlimited coffee refills with ketchup and mustard in squeeze bottles on the tables.

The food was good and people would drive 2 hours to eat there.

When I left home and went out into the big world I realized how strange it was that people would leave a large metropolitan area to go to this little small-town eatery.

Maybe it was the butter.

There was a big bowl of butter sitting right next to the waitress station. When the cook (We had a cook, not a chef. Everything but the lobster tail was either fried or deep-fried. The lobster tail was boiled.)

I digress…. When the cook put the plated food on the waitress station the last thing she did was slap a big knife-ful of butter on top. Steaks, potatoes, burgers, chops, fish, whatever, got the butter treatment.

This was Wisconsin (the dairy state). if a little butter is good – more is better.

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Grilled Lamb Steaks with Rosemary Mustard Butter

Lamb Steak

Lamb steak is a slice from the leg. It has a small bone in the center and we find it to be a better value and just as tender as chops. Use chops if you prefer.

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 2 servings 1x
  • Category: Lamb
  • Method: Grilling

Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 thick slices lamb or 46 center-cut lamb chops
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp celery salt
  • 1 tsp dried Herbes de Provence
  • Rosemary Mustard Butter:
  • 1 tbs chopped fresh rosemary
  • 2 tsp Dijon-style mustard
  • 4 tsp soft butter

Instructions

  • Sprinkle both sides of lamb with paprika, garlic, salt and Herbes.
  • Set aside for 15 minutes.
  • When ready cook over hot coals for 2 – 5 minutes a side depending on thickness and desired degree of doneness. We did these 2 minutes per side for medium rare.
  • When done to your liking remove from heat.
  • Top with Mustard Butter and serve.
  • To make Butter:  
  • Mix all ingredients, and allow to rest at room temperature to blend flavors.
  • Can be made earlier and / or in larger quantities and refrigerated until needed.

Notes

This is a ‘compound butter’, meaning it has flavorings added to it. Use whatever herbs you like. It keeps well in the fridge and can be added to pasta, rice, or potatoes as well as meats.

Keywords: grilled lamb, lamb steaks, rosemary butter

Grilled Lamb Steak, Mustard Butter

Living, as we do, in the middle of nowhere, France we tend to be a little behind on food trends.

Not that we don’t have access to wonderful foods here – we do. I can easily find foie gras, duck breast for grilling, and duck fat to use for frying. I can buy local lamb, venison, pork or chicken. But that is all traditional food in the French countryside.

When we first moved here I couldn’t get fresh, buffalo mozzarella or butternut squash or cranberries. Now I can, although not always locally.

When I saw burrata in the cheese counter I was excited. I had been reading about it on food blogs and Facebook and Twitter for a few years but it hadn’t been available before.

I wasn’t even sure what it was (I knew it was fresh cheese) but I knew I had to buy it and find out.

To be honest – I don’t know what all the internet fuss was about.

I googled it when I got home. It’s an outer shell of mozzarella with a center of cream and soft cheese.

I cut it in half and served it on salads for our starter.

It was good…. It just wasn’t wonderful.

Mon mari thought it was bland (I agree).

I could see it as a party dish, drizzled with olive oil and meant to be slathered on bread.

For us, I think we’ll just enjoy the buffalo mozzarella.

I should mention that I don’t like cream, either…. not in coffee or cereal or drizzled over cake.

But it was fun to try something new.

Comments 2

  1. I use compound butters occasionally. I make one I spread under the skin on our turkey at Christmas, but it’s a bit different than what I do on other meats. As to the burrata, it’s probably something that was “discovered” on one of those silly tik tok things where everything that was something when we were young suddenly becomes “the newly discovered biggest/bestest/most awesome thing ever! I have a few blogs I’ve quit following because tik tok has suddenly become their bible of choice.

    And you’re right. Burrata is tasteless…

    Reply
    • Isn’t awseomest a word lol Yet? I don’t think Burrata will last here in France. We tend to prefer really stinky, strong cheese although they will do mozzarella on a caprese salad

      Reply

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