Sweet Potato Fries; T-Day dinner

Looking for an easy last minute dish for the holidays?

You can make these Sweet Potato Fries in the oven after you take the turkey out to rest.

Or you can skip the turkey…. These are so good I would be happy with just a big plate all to myself.

Seriously, they’re like candy – but not the (sickeningly) sweet, marshmallow topped casseroles someone (who shall remain nameless) likes.

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Sweet Potato Fries

These are always a hit: a bit crisp on the outside from the caramelized sugars; like warm, creamy, sweet pudding on the inside….

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 2 servings 1x
  • Category: Sides
  • Method: Oven

Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 medium (14oz, 420gr) sweet potatoes
  • 1 1/2 tbs olive oil
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  • Slice potatoes in half the short way, then each half into 8 wedges.
  • Put oil into a large bowl, add potatoes and toss, coating thoroughly.
  • Arrange potatoes on baking sheet and bake at 400F for 30 minutes.
  • You can turn once if you like to fuss but I  don’t bother.
  • When done remove from pan and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper if you choose and serve.

Notes

How many wedges you cut will depend on the size of the sweet potato – and your own preference.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/2 recipe
  • Calories: 271
  • Sugar: 8.8 g
  • Sodium: 1295.5 mg
  • Fat: 10.6 g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.5 g
  • Trans Fat: 0 g
  • Carbohydrates: 42.3 g
  • Fiber: 6.3 g
  • Protein: 3.3 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg

Keywords: sweet potatoes, sweet potato fries

If you want something a bit fancier: Pommes Anna, with variations.

Sweet Potato Fries

What’s your favorite part of the big Turkey Day Dinner?

The food? The people? Football? (Is there still football?)

One of my aunts would never miss watching the Macy’s parade on tv… Do they still do that?

My first husband’s family held a penny-ante poker marathon after dinner which was always fun.

My sister’s in-laws were more into serious napping.

My mother tried for years to keep my nephews from starting to eat before all the food was on the table – and finishing before she had her first bite. She eventually won that war.

My favorite part when I was a child were the ‘relish trays’ that were only on the table for big dinners. These were small dishes filled with carrot sticks with dip, stuffed celery sticks, plus a variety of little pickles and olives. They were put on the table early and usually empty by the time we sat down to eat.

There was always a bit of good-natured arguing but never serious or political. It was the middle of deer-hunting season so there were more important things to talk about. And sno-mobile season was about to start.

It was fun and exhausting.

I’m not sure if it would be possible any longer. There would have to be rules…. I don’t like it when there has to be rules in order to have a pleasant gathering.

If you are gathering, I hope it’s pleasant.

2 thoughts on “Sweet Potato Fries; T-Day dinner”

  1. Happy ex-pat Thanksgiving to you both! Yes, there’s still football and the Macy’s parade. There’s the Lion’s playing their traditional Thanksgiving game and they’re actually on a winning streak this year. Shocking! I used to travel to NYC and sit in my Aunt’s den window and watch it. She lived in the Century building across from Central Park so it was a huge treat for me, especially when I was a child, to travel alone by plane. I spent a lot of time there when I was young.

    We just don’t discuss politics at our get togethers though I admit, there wouldn’t be any arguing if we did. I think we’re pretty much like-minded, so we really don’t have rules. This year is a bit different for us though. My father-in-law has not been well again so I’m doing the turkey and taking it down to his house. Sister-in-law is doing the rest. It won’t be our traditional get together, but it will be fine.

    Have a wonderful day!

    Reply
    • Traditions change as people get older (and / or move away).
      I never watched the parade. When I was young my mother did a big dinner for her siblings and kids so I was busy helping. We ate at noon.
      When I got older I was either doing the cooking or the traveling. My aunt, however, wouldn’t leave the house until it was over lol

      Reply

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