Crime (and Punishment) in Andorra

We didn't lock our house in Andorra.  It was common (when we first moved there, before there was permanent traffic gridlock) for people to leave there cars double-parked (there was very little legal parking), unlocked and running while they went into the shops to 'pick up a few things'.  Andorra's small, after all and, because … Continue reading…

Apartment v House? Where People Live..

Since we moved to France, at least three 'open' areas (fields) have been filled in with small, inexpensive, 'starter' houses.  They spring up like mushrooms overnight and are fully occupied within minutes of being finished.  Houses are becoming popular.  We, Brit's and Americans, tend to live in houses.  In the Mediterranean countries, people live in … Continue reading…

The Story of Turbot

After many months of going to the fishmonger in Andorra, I realized that I needed to learn fish.  My problems:  I didn't know what the fish were (all the names were in Catalan) and, even if I did know their names I still didn't know what to do with them.  So, every week I would … Continue reading…

Jam for the Church, one last bit of Irish humor

Europeans take their coffee sweet, or at least the Mediterranean countries do.  The typical coffee is a very strong brew served in a very tiny cup with 2 or 3 or even 4 large packets of sugar (and sometimes a dark, bitter chocolate that is meant to be melted in the coffee, not eaten as … Continue reading…

La Abandonada

I am a dog lover, always have been.  However, after 25 years of various animals I was thoroughly enjoying a 'pet-free' life in Andorra.  The neighbor's dogs were available if I felt the urge to pet something but if my husband suggested a few days in Barcelona we were off with no worries.  Freedom!  It … Continue reading…

Chickens, Pig Heads and other stuff

When I was very young, meat and chicken came from the butcher wrapped neatly in white paper. As I got older and started cooking it came wrapped in see-through film. We moved to Ireland and everything was pretty much the same – except at Easter. I was wandering through the market and saw a display … Continue reading…

Lunch at Ramon’s

Every Saturday, in the village of St. Julia, Andorra, there is a group of people meeting for lunch at Ramon's – also know as El Principat.  It's not a formal group.  Anyone can show up and be welcomed anytime. We went once a month. The only rule is that the gathering is for English speakers, … Continue reading…